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News as it Happens: An Introduction to Journalism

Online Newsgathering: Research and Reporting for Journalism

The Daily Miracle: An Introduction to Journalism

 
 


 

Stephen Lamble (16-09-1948—08-09-2016)

Academic qualifications:

PhD, University of Queensland; Bachelor of Letters (Honours, 1st-class), Deakin University; Diploma of Teaching, State College of Victoria, Frankston.

Professional experience:

An author, teacher, journalist, and academic, Stephen founded the journalism program at the University of the Sunshine Coast, where he is Adjunct Professor of Media Management and was foundation Head of the School of Communication. He retired from his full-time roles at the university in 2012 and remained keenly interested in journalism, history, law, education, research and mentoring until his death in September 2016.

A former senior staff journalist and bureau chief with News Limited's The Sunday Mail newspaper in Queensland, Stephen has been the Queensland finalist in three categories of the Walkley Awards for excellence in journalism, including sections for the best investigative article, best coverage of a current story and most outstanding contribution to journalism in all media.

The first edition of his most recent book, News as it Happens: An Introduction to Journalism, published by Oxford University Press, was co-winner with another title of the 2011 Australian Publishers' Association Educational Publishing Award for Excellence as Best Tertiary Education (wholly Australian) Single Title book. The award was judged for clarity of writing, pedagogical implications, illustrations, special features and characteristics, quality of subject matter, innovation and flair.

In a separate Australian Publishers Association award, News as it Happens was also judged Best Designed Tertiary and Further Education Book for 2011.

Revised and updated 2nd and 3rd editions of News as it Happens were published by Oxford University Press in 2013 and 2016.

Stephen is also co-author of The Daily Miracle: An Introduction to Journalism, 3rd edn., Oxford University Press, in conjunction with Dr David Conley PhD; and co-author of Online Newsgathering: Research and Reporting for Journalism, Focal Press, with Dr Stephen Quinn PhD.

One of the first journalists in Australia to research and write computer-assisted investigative articles, Stephen also has extensive experience as a photojournalist, sub-editor and editor of regional newspapers.

His research interests are in the fields of journalism education, journalism methodology, computer-assisted research, multi-platform news reporting, investigative journalism, feature writing, history, freedom of information, and comparative journalism law. He also has a strong interest in teacher education and prior to his retirement was registered as a secondary teacher with the Queensland College of Teachers.

In 2008 Stephen was awarded an Australian Learning and Teaching Council Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning. His citation was for 'creating innovative curricula and developing research-informed teaching resources that enhance graduate employment opportunities in the profession of journalism'. In 2009 he was awarded the University of the Sunshine Coast's Vice-Chancellor's Medal for Outstanding University Teacher.

Contact details:

Email: llamble@iinet.net.au

Professional affiliations:

Journalism Education and Research Association of Australia; the Copyright Agency.

Books:

Lamble, Stephen. (2016) News as it Happens: An Introduction to Journalism, 3rd edition, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne.

Lamble, Stephen. (2013) News as it Happens: An Introduction to Journalism, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne.

Lamble, Stephen. (2011) News as it Happens: An Introduction to Journalism, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne.

Quinn, Stephen & Lamble, Stephen. (2008) Online Newsgathering: Research and Reporting for Journalism, Focal Press, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Conley, David & Lamble, Stephen. (2006) The Daily Miracle: An Introduction to Journalism, 3rd edn., Oxford University Press, South Melbourne.

Journal articles:

Lamble, Stephen. (2004) "Documenting the methodology of journalism," Australian Journalism Review, Volume 26, No.1, July 2004, Journalism Education Association, Australia; University of South Australia, Adelaide: 85 - 106.

Lamble, Stephen. (2004) "Media use of FoI surveyed: New Zealand puts Australia and Canada to shame," Freedom of Information Review, No. 109, February 2004. Clayton: Legal Service Bulletin Co-operative Ltd., Law Faculty, Monash University, Victoria: 5 - 9.

Lamble, Stephen. (2003) "United States FoI laws are a poor model for statutes in other nations," Freedom of Information Review, No. 106, August 2003. Clayton: Legal Service Bulletin Co-operative Ltd., Law Faculty, Monash University, Victoria: 51 - 55.

Lamble, Stephen. (2003) "FoI as a United States' foreign policy tool: a carrot and stick approach," Freedom of Information Review, No. 105, June 2003. Clayton: Legal Service Bulletin Co-operative Ltd., Law Faculty, Monash University, Victoria: 38 - 43.

Lamble, Stephen. (2002) "Freedom of Information: a Finnish clergyman's gift to democracy", Freedom of Information Review, No. 97, February 2002. Clayton: Legal Service Bulletin Co-operative Ltd., Faculty of Law, Monash University: 2 - 8.

Lamble, Stephen. (2001) "Computer-Assisted Reporting and FoI - a PhD research project", Freedom of Information Review, No. 91, February 2001. Clayton: Legal Service Bulletin Co-operative Ltd., Faculty of Law, Monash University: 2 - 7.

Lamble, Stephen. (2001a) "Computer-Assisted Reporting, Philip Meyer and The Emperor's New Clothes", eJournalist, Media Traditions, edited by Denis Cryle and Alan Knight, 1 (2) 2001: http://www.ejournalism.au.com/ejournalist/lamble.pdf   See also: http://www.ejournalism.au.com/ejournalist/ for context.

Lamble, Stephen. (2000) "Slow on the uptake: Queensland Newspapers resists new technology", Australian Journalism Review, 22 (2), December 2000. Australian Journalism Education Association and the School of Professional Communications, University of Canberra: 103 - 110.

 

 
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